Hello everyone! Today we have part 2 to our other five wedding traditions’ post, so without further ado, let’s get started!

 

 

1)“San-san-kudo”sake tradition

A Japanese tradition, the bride and groom each drink from three cups of sake, starting from the smallest cup, to the largest. At the end of the ceremony, the bride and groom’s family then each drink a cup of sake to represent the unity of families.

 

2) Money Dance

To dance with the bride, men pin dollar bills onto the bride’s gown, some women pinning money onto the groom’s suit to dance with him. There is one line in front of the bride, and one in front of the groom, each guest given a moment to dance with the bride and groom before it is the next guest’s turn. A Polish tradition, the money was and is used to ensure that the newlyweds have enough money for their honeymoon.

 

3)LoveSpoons

A Lovespoon is a spoon carved out of a wood, with decorative carvings made onto it as a symbol of love toward the woman a gentlemen wishes to marry. In Norway weddings, newlyweds eat with spoons linked together, recognizing their linkage of marriage.Carved spoons are also used nowadays for special occasions everywhere, like anniversaries and Valentine’s Day gifts.

 

 

4) Rushnyk

Rushnyk is an Ukrainian embroidered and interwoven cloth. Red is the color most often used, representing the color of life, the sun, fertility, and health. Before the wedding, the bride and groom kneel before their parents on the Rushnyk, and the parents give the couple their blessing before they leave off to the church. During a wedding, the couple stands on a Rushnyk called pidnozhnyk, and as the bride walks forward, she drags the pidnozhnyk with, her bridesmaids following in back of her as she goes.

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5)Plate Dropping

Common in Slovakian weddings, plates are purposely dropped at wedding receptions. Both the bride and groom are expected to clean the mess up together as a way  to show their teamwork and endurance. Guests then try to spread the pieces out as much as they can, and each piece not picked up is the number of children the newlyweds will have.

 

 

Did any of these traditions sound familiar? Comment below on the common traditions that place within your family.

 

Picture provided by The Kat and The Falling Leaves